Weather apps …

A little explainer video from the Guardian on the bewildering array of weather apps

I spend a LOT of time obsessing about weather.

Most people working in outdoor activities in the UK will likely use MWIS. It is geared towards forecasting for the hill and mountain areas, i find it to be honest and to be the most reliable. It’s also valuable to watch the MWIS ‘week ahead’ weather videos that come out (normally) on a Friday.

For ‘normal’ day to day weather i use the Yr.No app from https://www.met.no The reason i do this is because a long time ago it was explained to me that the more humans that are involved in the forecasting (along with world class tech) the more accurate the weather. Although the forecasting for Yr is done in Norway, my location (in Sheffield) is covered by their forecasting.

If ever you are in the Alpine regions then you will see some extraordinarily detailed forecasting apps. Perhaps the gold standard of which is Meteo Suisse

It’s also worth keeping an eye on the barometer if you have one on a watch – many allow you to set weather alarms in case of significant barometric pressure change.

Niche but worth mentioning the superb SAIS app for avalanche awareness and winter conditions in Scotland

And of course most of the apps have the facility to filter the visible information, and some allow notifications to be set.

There is a bite-size free course here from the OU on how weather is forecasted

If you want to go a bit deeper in your learning there is a 100 hr weather e-learning course from the OU (costs £170)

There are also two excellent e-learning modules from the hugely knowledgeable Mike Raine here (‘weather for mountain leaders’) which you can study at home for just £1.99 each !!

58 degrees centigrade in Afghanistan !!

The subject can be a bit of a rabbit hole, and this ‘signposting’ article isn’t meant to be definitive !! However we (in the UK) inhabit a small island surrounded by water, and those of us that play in the hills and mountains must be aware of the impact (and potential dangers) that the westher can have on our activities. Being ‘weather aware’ is a necessary skill.

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